Social Science

Social Justice Studies explores the important terrain between ideals of justice and everyday local, national, and global realities of injustice. Emphasizing interdisciplinary academic understanding as well as applied experience in community, the major inspires critical thinkers to draw upon rich legacies of scholars and activists who animate and sustain democratic movements for change. Students who wish to be informed citizens committed to strategic, accountable, and reflective engagement in business, government, non-profit, science, humanities, and artistic careers will find Social Justice Studies coursework helpful and inspiring. The Associate in Arts in Social Justice Studies for Transfer degree is designed to prepare students for a seamless transfer into the CSU system to complete a baccalaureate degree in Social Justice Studies.

 (1) Completion of 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for transfer to the California State University, including both of the following:

 (A) The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University General Education ā€“ Breadth Requirements.

 (B) A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college district.

 (2) Obtainment of a minimum grade point average of 2.0.

ADTs also require that students must earn a C or better in all courses required for the major or area of emphasis.  A ā€œPā€ (Pass) grade is not an acceptable grade for courses in the major. 

Learning Outcome(s):
  1. Recognize and analyse the gap between local, national, and global realities, and the ideals of democracy and justice
  2. Apply history and theory to understand past and present movements for social change
  3. Experiment with a variety of social justice methods in students' own communities, evaluating the impacts not only upon the community but upon themselves
  4. Envision and assess national and global social justice approaches to contemporary challenges
Core Requirements (9 Units)
Units: 9
SOC 3
Sociology of Race, Ethnicity and Cultural Identity (Active)
3
and
SJS 5
Introduction to Women's Studies (Active)
3
and
CMUN 4
Intercultural Communication (Active)
3
or
SOC 1B
Introduction to Sociology: Social Problems (Active)
3
LIST A: Select three courses from at least two of the following areas (9 units)
Units: 9-12
Area 1:
Units: 0
HIST 12
Mexican American Cultural History (Active)
3
or
HUM 12
Mexican American Cultural History (Active)
3
HIST 5
Women's Lives in Early United States History (Active)3
3
HIST 6
Women's Lives in Recent United States History (Active)
3
POLS 9
Global Social Change (Historical)
3
Area 2
Units: 0
ENGL 2B
American Ethnic Literature (Historical)
3
ENGL 2E
Introduction to Women Writers (Active)
3
HIST 4A
Global History Before 1500 (Active)
3
HIST 4B
Global History After 1500 (Historical)
3
PHIL 3B
Contemporary Moral Issues (Active)
3
Area 3
Units: 0
SOC 1B
Introduction to Sociology: Social Problems (Active)
3
CMUN 6
Introduction to Conflict Resolution (Active)
3
or
POLS 6
Introduction to Conflict Resolution (Active)
3
or
PSYC 6
Introduction to Conflict Resolution (Active)
3
ANTH 3
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (Active)
3
ANTH 6
Culture and Politics of Africa (Historical)
3
Area 4
Units: 0
PSYC 32
Introduction to Research Methods (Active)
3
or
BUS 11
Statistics for Business and Economics (Active)
4
or
MATH 5
Introduction to Statistics (Active)
3
Area 5
Units: 0
SPAN 2B
Intermediate Spanish (Active)
5
or
SPAN 12A
Spanish for Spanish Speakers (Active)
5
General Education Requirements: CSU GE: 39; IGETC: 37
Units: 37-39
Total: 55-60
In this emphasis students will analyze theories and concepts related to social and psychological development, and political organizations. Students will study the scientific method and use research methodologies to analyze, compare and contrast, and synthesize psychological, political and social structures.
Learning Outcome(s):
  1. Students who complete this emphasis will be able to use their understanding of behavioral and organizational social sciences to document and evaluate models of personal, social, economic and political dynamics. In addition they will employ social sciences to propose means of resolving problems, and assess methods for making change.
REQUIREMENTS:
Units: 18
AJ 10
Introduction to the Administration of Justice (Historical)
3
AJ 18
Community Relations and the Justice System (Historical)
3
AH 3
The Person in the Life Cycle (Active)
3
AH 15
Survey of Human Anatomy and Physiology (Active)
5
or
BIO 15
Survey of Human Anatomy and Physiology (Active)
5
CD 2
Early Child Development (Active)
3
or
PSYC 2
Early Child Development (Active)
3
CD 3
Child Growth and Development During the School Years (Active)
3
or
PSYC 3
Child Growth and Development During the School Years (Active)
3
ECON 1
Principles of Macroeconomics (Active)
3
ECON 2
Principles of Microeconomics (Active)
3
JOUR 10
Mass Media and Society (Active)
3
or
SOC 10
Mass Media and Society (Active)
3
MATH 5
Introduction to Statistics (Active)
3
MATH 6
Calculus for Business/Social Science (Active)
3
POLS 6
Introduction to Conflict Resolution (Active)
3
or
CMUN 6
Introduction to Conflict Resolution (Active)
3
or
PSYC 6
Introduction to Conflict Resolution (Active)
3
PSYC 7
Cultural Context of Child and Family in a Diverse Society (Active)
3
or
CD 7
Cultural Context of Child and Family in a Diverse Society (Active)
3
POLS 1
Introduction to American Government (Active)
3
POLS 3
Introduction to Comparative Politics (Historical)
3
POLS 4
Introduction to International Relations (Historical)
3
PSYC 10
Introduction to Psychology (Active)
3
PSYC 11
Biological Psychology (Active)
3
SOC 1A
Introduction to Sociology (Active)
3
SOC 1B
Introduction to Sociology: Social Problems (Active)
3
SOC 3
Sociology of Race, Ethnicity and Cultural Identity (Active)
3
SOC 4
Sociology of Gender (Active)
3
SOC 21
Marriage and the Family (Active)
3
General Education Requirements:
Units: 35-39
A student may complete the Gavilan College A.A./A.S. general education, the CSU-GE Breadth or the IGETC pattern, plus sufficient electives to meet a 60 unit total. See a counselor for details. NOTE: A course may be used to satisfy both general education and major requirements. See "Double Counting Rule".
Total: 53-57
In this emphasis students will analyze theories and concepts related to the development of cultural and historical development of societies. Students will study social science theory and practice to analyze, compare and contrast and synthesize aspects of societies and events from different regions and eras.
Learning Outcome(s):
  1. Students completing this emphasis will be able to critically examine contemporary social, economic, and political environments. Through social science methods students will explain the influences individuals, social groups, and governments have upon one another; and will document and evaluate models of social stratification based on class, ethnicity, and gender; and assess their impact.
REQUIREMENTS:
Units: 18
CMUN 6
Introduction to Conflict Resolution (Active)
3
or
POLS 6
Introduction to Conflict Resolution (Active)
3
or
PSYC 6
Introduction to Conflict Resolution (Active)
3
ANTH 1
Introduction to Physical Anthropology (Active)
3
ANTH 2
Introduction to Archaeology (Active)
3
ANTH 3
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (Active)
3
ANTH 5
Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion (Historical)
3
ART 10A
Cultural History of Ceramics (Historical)
3
ART 21
Ancient Americas: A History through Art (Historical)
3
CD 5
Child/Family and Community (Active)
3
CD 6
Games and Rhythms for Children (Historical)
3
or
KIN 6
Games and Rhythms for Children (Historical)
3
ECON 1
Principles of Macroeconomics (Active)
3
ECON 2
Principles of Microeconomics (Active)
3
GEOG 2
Cultural Geography (Active)
3
HIST 1
United States History through Reconstruction (Active)
3
HIST 2
United States History Reconstruction to the Present (Active)
3
HIST 3
History of California (Active)
3
HIST 4A
Global History Before 1500 (Active)
3
HIST 4B
Global History After 1500 (Historical)
3
HIST 5
Women's Lives in Early United States History (Active)
3
HIST 6
Women's Lives in Recent United States History (Active)
3
HIST 7A
History of Western Civilization (Historical)
3
HIST 7B
History of Western Civilization (Historical)
3
HIST 12
Mexican American Cultural History (Active)
3
or
HUM 12
Mexican American Cultural History (Active)
3
HIST 21
Ancient Americas: A History through Art (Historical)
3
POLS 1
Introduction to American Government (Active)
3
SOC 1A
Introduction to Sociology (Active)
3
SOC 1B
Introduction to Sociology: Social Problems (Active)
3
SOC 3
Sociology of Race, Ethnicity and Cultural Identity (Active)
3
SOC 4
Sociology of Gender (Active)
3
General Education Requirements:
Units: 35-39
A student may complete the Gavilan College A.A./A.S. general education, the CSU-GE Breadth or the IGETC pattern, plus sufficient electives to meet a 60 unit total. See a counselor for details. NOTE: A course may be used to satisfy both general education and major requirements. See "Double Counting Rule".
Total: 53-57
SOC 1AIntroduction to Sociology (3.0)Historical
3.0 Lecture. Analysis of the structure and dynamics of human society focusing on basic concepts, theories and methods; the development of culture; the socialization process; group behavior; social inequality, deviance; sexism, racism, and ageism; major social structures and social institutions; human ecology, and global dynamics. Emphasizes contemporary American society. (C-ID: SOCI 110) ADVISORY: Eligible for English 250 and English 260. (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Spring 2015 to Fall 2020.
SOC 1AIntroduction to Sociology (3.0)Active
3.0 Lecture. Analysis of the structure and dynamics of human society focusing on basic concepts, theories and methods; the development of culture; the socialization process; group behavior; social inequality, deviance; sexism, racism, and ageism; major social structures and social institutions; human ecology, and global dynamics. Emphasizes contemporary American society. (C-ID: SOCI 110) ADVISORY: Completion of English 280 or equivalent skill level recommended. (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Fall 2020.
SOC 1BIntroduction to Sociology: Social Problems (3.0)Active
3.0 Lecture. This course provides an overview of how sociologists understand, identify, and address social problems, including the role of power and ideology in the definition of social problems. Students will be introduced to and critically evaluate various theories to explain and analyze the causes and consequences of social problems, their presence in our lives, and the extent to which they can be defined as social problems. In addition to identifying contemporary social problems, students will explore the root causes of these social problems and search for potential solutions and methods of intervention. Some issues that may be examined are: economic globalization, immigration, poverty, inequalities in educational and employment opportunities, race and gender inequality, and crime and violence in society. (C-ID: SOCI 115) ADVISORY: Sociology 1A. (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Spring 2017.
SOC 3Sociology of Race, Ethnicity and Cultural Identity (3.0)Historical
3.0 Lecture. This course is designed to introduce students to the basic sociological concepts and theories of race, ethnicity and cultural identity in U.S. society. Students will examine race, ethnicity and cultural identity as social constructs that permeate social structures and institutions, and how they change over time and space. Over the semester students will critically analyze the ways which race, ethnicity, class, and gender/sexuality continually shape people's lives and experiences. While the class focuses on U.S. societies, students will also critically compare and contrast race and ethnicity in other societies. (C-ID: SOCI 150) ADVISORY: Eligible for English 250 and English 260. (Option of a standard letter grade or Pass/no pass.) Effective: Fall 2018 to Fall 2020.
SOC 3Sociology of Race, Ethnicity and Cultural Identity (3.0)Active
3.0 Lecture. This course is designed to introduce students to the basic sociological concepts and theories of race, ethnicity and cultural identity in U.S. society. Students will examine race, ethnicity and cultural identity as social constructs that permeate social structures and institutions, and how they change over time and space. Over the semester students will critically analyze the ways which race, ethnicity, class, and gender/sexuality continually shape people's lives and experiences. While the class focuses on U.S. societies, students will also critically compare and contrast race and ethnicity in other societies. (C-ID: SOCI 150) ADVISORY: Eligible for English 250 and English 260. (Option of a standard letter grade or Pass/no pass.) Effective: Fall 2020.
SOC 4Sociology of Gender (3.0)Active
3.0 Lecture. This course is designed to introduce students to gender as a basic organizing principle of social life at the macro-analytic institutional level and the micro-analytic individual level. Students will examine how gender, femininity, and masculinity are socially constructed, and how these constructions shape gender, the socialization of gender, how individuals "do" gender, and how these affect self-identity, interpersonal interaction, and inequality in society. Students will critically analyze the interactions of gender with race, class, sexuality, the impact of economic and political change on gender expectations and practices. NOTE: Course formerly Sociology of Women and Men (C-ID: SOCI 140) ADVISORY:ENGL 280 or eligible for ENGL 1A . (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Spring 2020.
SOC 4Sociology of Women and Men (3.0)Historical
3.0 Lecture. This course is designed to introduce students to gender as a basic organizing principle of social life at the macro-analytic institutional level and the micro-analytic individual level. Students will examine how gender, femininity, and masculinity are socially constructed, and how these constructions shape gender, the socialization of gender, how individuals "do" gender, and how these affect self-identity, interpersonal interaction, and inequality in society. Students will critically analyze the interactions of gender with race, class, sexuality, the impact of economic and political change on gender expectations and practices. (C-ID: SOCI 140) ADVISORY: Eligible for English 250 and English 260. (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Spring 2017 to Spring 2020.
SOC 9Global Social Change (3.0)Historical
3.0 Lecture. This course examines the social, economic and political forces that have led to a process known as "globalization." It explores how the global integration of societies, economics, and cultures fundamentally transforms human life with specific emphasis on: the global economy and economic development; transnational political organizations; culture and identity; the effect of globalization on social stratification, including gender/race/ethnic inequalities; transnational migration; environmental change; and transnational social movements. Also listed as POLS 9. PREREQUISITE: English 250 ADVISORY: English 1A (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Fall 2020.
SOC 9Global Social Change (3.0)Historical
3.0 Lecture. This course examines the social, economic and political forces that have led to a process known as "globalization." It explores how the global integration of societies, economics, and cultures fundamentally transforms human life with specific emphasis on: the global economy and economic development; transnational political organizations; culture and identity; the effect of globalization on social stratification, including gender/race/ethnic inequalities; transnational migration; environmental change; and transnational social movements. Also listed as POLS 9. PREREQUISITE: English 250 ADVISORY: English 1A (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Fall 2012 to Fall 2020.
SOC 10Mass Media and Society (3.0)Active
3.0 Lecture. This course helps students understand the 20th century revolution in mass media by focusing on the history, economics and social impact of the newspaper, book publishing, magazine, film, television, public relations, advertising and music industries. Students will study audience, propaganda and mass communication theory; and discuss new technology, ethnic media in the United States, ethical issues and attempts to regulate or control the media. Honors students will complete more in-depth analysis of media issues, and will finish a media-related research project. This course is also listed as JOUR 10. This course has the option of a letter grade or pass/no pass. (Option of a standard letter grade or Pass/no pass.) Effective: Summer 2020.
SOC 10Mass Media and Society (3.0)Historical
3.0 Lecture. This course helps us understand the 20th century revolution in mass media by focusing on the history, economics and social impact of the newspaper, book publishing, magazine, film, television, public relations, advertising and music industries. We will study audience, propaganda and mass communication theory; we will discuss new technology, ethnic media in the U.S., ethical issues and attempts to regulate or control the media. Honors students will complete more in-depth analysis of media issues, and will finish a media-related research project. This course is also listed as JOUR 10. This course has the option of a letter grade or pass/no pass. ADVISORY: English 250, English 260 (Option of a standard letter grade or Pass/no pass.) Effective: Fall 2016 to Summer 2020.
SOC 21Marriage and the Family (3.0)Historical
3.0 Lecture. Overview of the sociological study of the family as a social institution. Examines historical and contemporary family patterns, theoretical perspectives regarding family roles and formation, and the effect of the economy, public policy, and other social institutions on families. Emphasis placed on gender, sexuality, social class, and racial/ethnic diversity in American families. (C-ID: SOCI 130) ADVISORY: Eligible for English 1A. (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Fall 2017 to Fall 2020.
SOC 21Marriage and the Family (3.0)Active
3.0 Lecture. Overview of the sociological study of the family as a social institution. Examines historical and contemporary family patterns, theoretical perspectives regarding family roles and formation, and the effect of the economy, public policy, and other social institutions on families. Emphasis placed on gender, sexuality, social class, and racial/ethnic diversity in American families. (C-ID: SOCI 130) ADVISORY: Eligible for English 1A. (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Fall 2020.
SOC 22Field Work and Service (0.5-1.0)Active
1.5-3.0 TBA. Supervised field work within the college and with local agencies. Students serve in useful group activities in leadership roles prescribed for them by faculty or community agencies. A maximum of six units may be completed. This is a pass/no pass course. REQUIRED: Learning contracts must be filled out and signed by the student and the supervising instructor. (Pass/No Pass.) Effective: Spring 2011.
SOC 23Independent Study (1.0-2.0)Active
3.0-6.0 TBA. Designed to afford selected students specialized opportunities for exploring areas at the independent study level. The courses may involve extensive library work, research in the community, or special projects. May be repeated until six units of credit are accrued. This course has the option of a letter grade or pass/no pass. REQUIRED: The study outline prepared by the student and the instructor must be filed with the department and the dean. (Option of a standard letter grade or Pass/no pass.) Effective: Spring 2011.
SOC 25Sociology of Crime and Deviance (3.0)Active
3.0 Lecture. Sociological analysis of crime and deviance, criminal and deviant behavior, and the criminal justice system. Explores the history and social construction of crime and criminality and examines the definition of crime and its violations as well as the laws and methods used to control criminal behavior. Discuss measurement of crime and basic theoretical explanations of criminal behavior. Advisory: Completion of ENGL 280 or equivalent. C-ID (SOCI 160). (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Fall 2020.