Anthropology

The Associate in Arts in Anthropology for Transfer degree is designed to prepare students for a seamless transfer into the CSU system to complete a baccalaureate degree in Anthropology.

The Gavilan College Anthropology Program encompasses three subfields: cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, and archaeology. Together, these subfields offer a broad range of perspectives on the experiences and politics of being human. The courses offered teach students to develop a comprehensive understanding of humans in their diversity and complexity. These courses may be taken to satisfy the General Education requirements or to meet the requirements for an Associate in Arts in Anthropology for Transfer (ADT) degree. The ADT in Anthropology degree prepares students to transfer into the CSU system to pursue a baccalaureate degree in Anthropology or a related major.

 Upon completion of the AA-T degree in Anthropology, students will be able to:

  • Critically examine and analyze human nature and behavior.
  • Critically examine and analyze anthropological ideas and data from a social justice perspective.
  • Describe cultural change from historical, political economic, symbolic, and discursive perspectives.
  • Describe biological and cultural factors responsible for human variation.
  • Distinguish variations in culture using a cultural relativist perspective.
  • Evaluate social scientific theories, methods, and techniques used to investigate the human past and present.
  • Conduct ethnographic research within a local community.
  • Write research papers using ethnographic, descriptive and analytic techniques.

Associate Degree for Transfer Requirements:

(1) Completion of 60 semester units that are eligible for transfer to the California State University, including both of the following:

(A) The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University General Education - Breadth Requirements.

(B) A minimum of 18 semester units in a major or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college district.

(2) Obtainment of a minimum grade point average of 2.0.

Title 5 section 55063(a) also require that students must earn a C or better in all courses required for the major or area of emphasis, or a "P" if the course was taken on a 'pass-no-pass' basis.

REQUIRED CORE:
Units: 9
ANTH 1
Introduction to Physical Anthropology (Active)
3
ANTH 2
Introduction to Archaeology (Active)
3
ANTH 3
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (Active)
3
LIST A
Units: 3
MATH 5
Introduction to Statistics (Historical)
3
LIST B:
Units: 3-4
BIO 7
Human Anatomy (Active)
4
ANTH 32
Introduction to Research Methods (Active)
3
or
PSYC 32
Introduction to Research Methods (Active)
3
LIST C: Select one course or any course from LIST B not already used.
Units: 3-4
ANTH 1L
Physical Anthropology Lab (Active)
1
ANTH 5
Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion (Historical)
3
ANTH 6
Culture and Politics of Africa (Historical)
3
HIST 4A
Global History Before 1500 (Active)
3
HIST 4B
Global History After 1500 (Historical)
3
HIST 12
Mexican American Cultural History (Active)
3
MUS 6
Introduction to World Music (Active)
3
PHIL 6
Comparative Religions (Active)
3
POLS 3
Introduction to Comparative Politics (Historical)
3
POLS 4
Introduction to International Relations (Historical)
3
SOC 1A
Introduction to Sociology (Active)
3
SOC 1B
Introduction to Sociology: Social Problems (Active)
3
SOC 3
Sociology of Race, Ethnicity and Cultural Identity (Historical)
3
SOC 4
Sociology of Gender (Active)
3
Units Required for the Major: (18 - 20 Units)
Units:  
General Education Requirements: CSU: 39; IGETC: 37
Units: 37-39
Double Counted Units: CSU: 12 - 16; IGETC: 12 - 16
Units:  
Electives needed to get to 60 Units: CSU: 13 - 19; IGETC: 15 - 21
Units:  
Total Units for the Degree: 60 Units
Units:  
Total: 55-59

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ANTH 1Introduction to Physical Anthropology (3.0)Active
3.0 Lecture. This course introduces the concepts, methods of inquiry, and scientific explanations for biological evolution and their application to the human species. Issues and topics will include, but are not limited to, genetics, evolutionary theory, human variation and biocultural adaptations, comparative primate anatomy and behavior, and the fossil evidence for human evolution. The scientific method serves as foundation of the course. (C-ID: ANTH 110) ADVISORY: English 250, English 260 and Mathematics 205. (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Spring 2016.
ANTH 1LPhysical Anthropology Lab (1.0)Active
3.0 Lab. This laboratory course is offered as a supplement to Introduction to Physical Anthropology either taken concurrently or in a subsequent term. Laboratory exercises are designed to introduce students to the scientific method and hands-on exploration of topics in physical anthropology: genetics; human oteology; comparative and functional skeletal anatomy; primate behavior; human fossil record; modern human variation; and other resources to investigate processes related to human evolution. PREREQUISITE: ANTH 1, Introduction to Physical Anthropology, may be taken concurrently. ADVISORY: English 250. (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Spring 2015.
ANTH 2Introduction to Archaeology (3.0)Historical
3.0 Lecture. This course is an introduction to the study of concepts, theories, data and models of anthropological archaeology that contribute to our knowledge of the human past. The course includes a discussion of the nature of scientific inquiry; the history and interdisciplinary nature of archaeological research; dating techniques; methods of survey, excavation, analysis, and interpretation; cultural resource management; professional ethics; and selected cultural sequences. The course surveys selected prehistoric cultures. (C-ID: ANTH 150) ADVISORY: Recommended English 250 and English 260. (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Fall 2014 to Spring 2020.
ANTH 2Introduction to Archaeology (3.0)Active
3.0 Lecture. This course is an introduction to the study of concepts, theories, data and models of anthropological archaeology that contribute to our knowledge of the human past. The course includes a discussion of the nature of scientific inquiry; the history and interdisciplinary nature of archaeological research; dating techniques; methods of survey, excavation, analysis, and interpretation; cultural resource management; professional ethics; and selected cultural sequences. The course surveys selected prehistoric cultures. (C-ID: ANTH 150) (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Spring 2020.
ANTH 22Field Work and Service (0.5-1.0)Active
1.5-3.0 TBA. Supervised field work within the college and with local agencies. Students serve in useful group activities in leadership roles prescribed for them by faculty or community agencies. A maximum of six units may be completed. This is a pass/no pass course. REQUIRED: Learning contracts must be filled out and signed by the student and the supervising instructor. (Pass/No Pass.) Effective: Spring 2015.
ANTH 3Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3.0)Active
3.0 Lecture. The course explores how anthropologists study and compare human cultures. Cultural anthropologists seek to understand the broad arc of human experience focusing on a set of central issues: how people around the world make their living (subsistence patterns); how they organize themselves socially, politically and economically; how they communicate; how they relate to each other through family and kinship ties; what they believe about the world (belief systems); how they express themselves creatively (expressive culture); how they make distinction among themselves such as through applying gender, racial and ethnic labels; how they have shaped and been shaped by social inequalities such as colonialism; and how they navigate culture change and processes of globalization that affect us all. Ethnographic case studies highlight these similarities and differences, and introduce students to how anthropologists do their work, employ professional anthropological research ethics and apply their perspectives and skills to understand humans around the globe. Students will write a research paper based on original fieldwork in a local community. (C-ID: ANTH 120) ADVISORY: Eligible for English 250 and English 260. (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Fall 2015.
ANTH 32Introduction to Research Methods (3.0)Historical
3.0 Lecture. An overview of the methodologies used in experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental research in psychology. Students will learn how to design and conduct research, including formulating hypotheses, reviewing the literature, evaluating ethical issues, selecting methodologies, organizing data, applying statistics, and writing reports. This course is also listed as PSYC 32 and POLS 32. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 10 with a grade or "C" or better and MATH 5 with a grade of "C" or better. (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Spring 2017 to Spring 2020.
ANTH 32Introduction to Research Methods (3.0)Active
3.0 Lecture. An overview of the methodologies used in experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental research in psychology. Students will learn how to design and conduct research, including formulating hypotheses, reviewing the literature, evaluating ethical issues, selecting methodologies, organizing data, applying statistics, and writing reports. This course is also listed as PSYC 32 and POLS 32. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 10 with a grade or "C" or better and MATH 5 with a grade of "C" or better. (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Spring 2020.
ANTH 5Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion (3.0)Active
3.0 Lecture. Explores and analyzes, from a cross-cultural and comparative perspective, religious traditions in diverse cultural contexts with particular focus on the effects of globalization on religious beliefs and practices. Cross-cultural analysis of the concepts of magic, witchcraft, and religion. Examination of connections among the concepts of race, nation, and religion. Exploration of the above through ethnographic readings, class discussions, films, short papers, and a final research paper based on original fieldwork in a local religious or spiritual community. PREREQUISITE: Eligible for English 1A. (Standard Letter Grade.) Effective: Fall 2017.

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